Veterinary Medical Technologist

The Veterinary Technology Curriculum prepares the graduate to assist the veterinarian in small and large animal practices by obtaining and recording information about cases; preparing animals, instruments, equipment and medication for examination and surgery; collecting specimens; performing laboratory procedures; applying bandages and splints; and feeding animals and maintaining proper sanitation of animals and their environment.

www.gaston.eduThe Veterinary Medical Technology Program is a two-year, 5 semester course of study (73 semester credit hours) leading to an Associate of Applied Science degree. The program is designed to provide both the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary for a professional career as a veterinary technician. Most graduate veterinary technicians work as professional assistants to veterinarians. There is a growing demand for veterinary technicians in sales, biomedical research, diagnostic laboratories, government, and other animal health-related industry.

Students also learn skills in office management, record keeping and communications. A 2003 survey of veterinary technicians in the US indicated that the full-time experienced technician salary average for Registered Veterinary Technicians is approximately $30,500. Full benefit packages are usually provided. According to national surveys, salaries are increasing yearly.

Graduates may work in private veterinarians’ offices, diagnostic and research laboratories, veterinary supply businesses, and other areas dealing with animal care.

Graduates are eligible to sit for the National Veterinary Technician Exam and the State Licensing Examination given by the North Carolina Veterinary Medical Board.

For more information on the field of veterinary technology, consult the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America, (NAVTA) at www.navta.net. This information provided by the Veterinary Medical Technology program at Gaston College, Dallas, North Carolina. For more information see www.gaston.edu.

Last updated: June 2006